Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology

Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology

Earn Your Diploma

The Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology program at DCC is your path to a rewarding career with multiple areas of specialization. With increasing job growth both in Virginia and nationwide, graduates of our program will have the degree and necessary skills to find many employment opportunities in both industry and business. The Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology program is designed to develop a general foundation in electricity, electronics, theorems, networks and fundamental circuits. Our curriculum also provides students with the professional skills needed to advance their careers in the electrical/electronic industry.

Program Objectives

Graduates of our program will be able to apply their knowledge and skills to solve practical problems and will be procedurally compliant in the electrical/electronic industry. They will display technical inquisitiveness by demonstrating the ability to be trained in a wide area of expertise in the electrical/electronic industry, and they will continue to learn, develop their skills, and seek knowledge in an ever changing field. During the course of study, graduates will have acquired excellent oral and written communication skills. Our graduates will also display and demonstrate high standards of ethical and professional behavior through teamwork and personal accountability.

Students will graduate with a diploma in Electrical/Electronics Technology and certificates in Industrial Electrical Principles and Industrial Electronic Principles.

Here are just a few of the challenging careers available for Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology graduates:

  • Automation Control
  • Biomedical Electronics Technician
  • Communications Technician
  • Computer Technician
  • Electrical Power Utility Technician
  • Laboratory Technician
  • Robotics Technician
  • Telecommunications Technician

For More Information About the EEET Program

If you have questions or would like more information about the E/E Engineering Technology program, please fill out this form. If you would like to register for a course, please go to MyDCC.

Preferred method of contact?
EmailPhone

Best time to contact you?
AMAfternoonPM

Have you ever attended DCC?
YesNo

EEET Overview

Program: Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology

Program Length: Six semesters including two summer terms

Degree Offered:

Students will graduate with:

  • Diploma in Electrical/Electronics Technology
  • Certificate in Industrial Electrical Principles
  • Certificate in Industrial Electronic Principles

Program Requirements:  Read more

Admission Requirements:  Read more

Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology Courses

CST 100 - Principles of Public Speaking

Applies theory and principles of public address with emphasis on preparation and delivery.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ECO 100 - Elementary Economics

Introduces students to the most basic elements of economics without detailed study of theory. Presents and interprets current issues and concerns publicized in the media. Allows students to understand and grasp the importance of local, state, and national issues with economic themes and overtones.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

SDV 100 - College Success Skills

Assists students in transition to colleges. Provides overviews of college policies, procedures, curricular offerings. Encourages contacts with other students and staff. Assists students toward college success through information regarding effective study habits, career and academic planning, and other college resources available to students. May include English and Math placement testing. Strongly recommended for beginning students. Required for graduation.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Total 1 hour per week.
1 credit

ITE 116 - Survey of Computer Software Applications

Review current business software applications for microcomputers emphasizing comparison of a variety of software packages. Provides experience with multiple operating system commands, database, spreadsheet, and word processing programs.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Total 2 hours per week.
2 credits

ENG 131 - Technical Report Writing I

Offers a review of organizational skills including paragraph writing and basic forms of technical communications, various forms of business correspondence, and basic procedures for research writing. Includes instruction and practice in oral communication skills.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

PED - Physical Education Elective

2 credits

ELE 113 - Electricity I

Teaches principles of electricity covering fundamentals, devices and components in both DC and AC circuits. Part I of II.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 123 - Electrical Applications I

Provides laboratory and shop assignments/jobs as applied to fundamental principles of electricity with emphasis on measurements and evaluation of electrical components, devices and circuits. Part I of II.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
2 credits

ELE 124 - Electrical Applications II

Provides laboratory and shop assignments/jobs as applied to fundamental principles of electricity with emphasis on measurements and evaluation of electrical components, devices and circuits. Part II of II.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
2 credits

ELE 152 - Electrical-Electronic Calculations I

Includes general math, scale readings, conversions between units of measure and algebra with exponents and radicals as it applies to DC circuits.[First of a three-sequence course].

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 153 - Electrical-Electronic Calculations II

Includes a review of DC applications, angular measurements, right triangle ratios, vector and vector algebra as it applies to AC circuits. [Second of a three-sequence course]. Prerequisite: ELE 152.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 156 - Electrical Control Systems

Includes troubleshooting and servicing electrical controls, electric motors, motor controls, motor starters, relays, overloads, instruments and control circuits.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 4 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 158 - Surface Mount Soldering

Emphasizes high reliability soldering concepts and soldering standards as applied to surface mount soldering and rework, covering identification, installation and removal of components, using various equipment including hot air and soldering iron. Provides an introduction to IPC-A-610 soldering standards.

Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
1 credit

ELE 216 - Industrial Electricity

Studies rotating devices, single phase and polyphase distribution, magnetic devices, circuits and systems for industrial applications.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 217 - Electric Power Utilities

Provides an introduction to the electric power utilities field. Examines the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
2 credits

ELE 239 - Programmable Controllers

Examines installation, programming, interfacing, and concepts of troubleshooting programmable controllers.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

ELE 295 - Topics In

Provides an opportunity to explore topical areas of interest to or needed by students.

May be used also for special honors courses. May be repeated for credit.

Lecture 1 hour per week.
1 credit

ETR 123 - Electronic Applications I

Provides laboratory and shop experience as applied to basic electronic devices, circuits and systems with emphasis on practical measurements. Part I of II.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
2 credits

ETR 124 - Electronic Applications II

Provides laboratory and shop experience as applied to basic electronic devices, circuits and systems with emphasis on practical measurements. Part II of II.

Lecture 1 hour per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
2 credits

ETR 136 - General Industrial Electronic Systems

Studies devices, circuits, power modules, analog and digital, open and closed loop control and servo systems. May include laboratory projects and modular troubleshooting.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

ETR 141 - Electronics I

Introduces electronic devices as applied to basic electronic circuits and systems. Part I of II.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ETR 142 - Electronics II

Introduces electronic devices as applied to basic electronic circuits and systems. Part II of II.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Total 3 hours per week.
3 credits

ETR 151 - Electronic Circuits and Troubleshooting I

Studies analog and digital circuits and systems with standard circuit test and troubleshooting procedures. Part I of II.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Total 2 hours per week.
2 credits

ETR 152 - Electronic Circuits and Troubleshooting II

Studies analog and digital circuits and systems with standard circuit test and troubleshooting procedures. Part II of II.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Total 2 hours per week.
2 credits

ETR 241 - Electronic Communications I

Studies noise, information and bandwidth, modulation and demodulation, transmitters and receivers, wave propagation, antennas and transmission lines. Includes broad band communication systems, microwave, both terrestrial and satellite, fiber optics, multiplexing and associated hardware. Part I of II.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

ETR 243 - Digital, Analog, and Data Communication Systems I

Teaches theory and implementation of digital and analog circuits in communication systems. Includes PCM, multiplexing, analog modulation, analysis and performance of transmitters and receivers. Includes optical satellite and other communications systems. Prerequisite: Knowledge of D.C./A.C. theory and devices. Part I of II.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 6 hours per week.
4 credits

ETR 255 - Active Devices and Circuits

Teaches theory of active devices and circuits, devices and circuit parameters, semiconductor characteristics and the application of circuits to active systems. Includes testing and analysis of active devices and circuits. Prerequisite: Knowledge of D.C./A.C. theory.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

ETR 282 - Digital Systems I

Includes programming, circuitry, logic, operation interfacing of computer and microprocessing systems. Includes pulse circuits and pulse logic systems as applied to computer and microprocessor technology. Part I of II.

Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Total 5 hours per week.
3 credits

Register For A Course

If you would like to register for a course, please go to MyDCC.

Our EEET Grads are Highly Employable

My name is Kyle Eanes, I graduated from the Electrical/Electronics program in 2015. I am currently employed with Nestle USA, here in Danville, Virginia. My employment with this company started on the last day of classes at DCC, to which I can say that thus far I love my job.

When I was a senior in high school, I knew what occupation I wanted to be in, but I was unsure of the path that would get me there. This is where the Electrical/Electronics program came into play.  When I was researching courses at DCC in my program of study, the Electrical/Electronics really stood apart from the others for several reasons. One reason I liked the program was due to the wide spectrum of information that was to be covered by the courses. With this program a student learns about things from low voltage electronic components to high voltage transformers, substations, etc. Another reason I liked the program was due to the fact that I would be able to grow as a student. Before attending DCC, while in high school, I attended the Pittsylvania County Career & Technical Center where I took four semesters of electrical classes taught by Mr. Jim Pollard. So going into the program I already had experience in the electrical field, but I wanted to take that experience to a much greater level. Which I did, thanks to the wide variety of material in this program. Another aspect that I really liked about the program was how it prepared a student to be employable after college. Employable meaning that a person has the skills to perform the job, but that you are also teachable. Teachable in the aspect of wanting to learn more about the job and widen the range of skills you have. The program is a hands-on program but also covers theories dealing with electricity. The hands-on part of the program includes things that are used on a day-to-day basis in the world of jobs. Meaning that the equipment you use in class and equipment you will potentially use on the job are the same, thus shrinking the learning curve on the job.

Upon graduating DCC and starting my job, I then realized how well the program had prepared me for my field of occupation. I highly recommend this program for anyone who is interested in the occupation of electricity but in unsure of what division they want to work in.

Kyle Eanes

EEET 2015

My name is David Richey, and I graduated out of the Electrical Electronic Engineering Technology Department at Danville community College in July of 2015.  I was a humble guy working at McDonald’s part time, stressed out and going to school full time at DCC, because I wanted a better life. I saw the Electrical Electronics Engineering degree at DCC and knew that the money was outstanding for graduates. I enrolled and studied hard, though I wasn’t the best student all the time or the favorite. I was even was thrown out of class. I was determined and graduated with honors. I went on several interviews and then 8 months later I got a job with Virginia Dominion Power. They gave me a sign-on bonus which was enough to buy a new car and have a 401k. I truly love my job. I recommend anyone with the drive to want a better life and is decent at math to do what I did. It was one of the best decisions of my life, and the teachers at DCC taught more than and better than other colleges, come to find out. I am planning on getting my Bachelor’s degree and continuing my studies through Dominion Power.

David Richey

EEET 2015

Contacts

Teresa Hawker

Teresa Hawker

Assistant Professor of Electrical/Electronics
434-797-8425
thawker@dcc.vccs.edu

George M. Turnbull

George M. Turnbull

Associate Professor of Electrical/Electronics
434-797-8537
gturnbull@dcc.vccs.edu

Top